President Donald Trump cried as he promised to repeal NAFTA and other trade deals he considered unfair to the United States. On August 27, 2018, he announced a new trade agreement with Mexico, which is expected to replace it. The U.S.-Mexico trade agreement, as has been said, would maintain duty-free access for agricultural products on both sides of the border and eliminate non-tariff barriers, while encouraging more agricultural trade between Mexico and the United States and effectively replacing NAFTA. According to a report by the New York City public tank report, Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), bilateral agricultural trade tripled between 1994 and 2017 and is considered one of the main economic effects of NAFTA on trade between the United States and Canada, with Canada becoming the largest importer of U.S. agricultural sectors. [64] Fears of job losses in the U.S. manufacturing sector were not due to the fact that manufacturing employment remained “stable”. Given Canada`s labour productivity, which rose to 72% of the U.S. level, hopes of closing the “productivity gap” between the two countries were also not realized. [64] In 2008, Canadian exports to the United States and Mexico totaled $381.3 billion, while imports totaled $245.1 billion.

[59] According to a 2004 paper by University of Toronto economist Daniel Trefler, NAFTA provided Canada with a significant net benefit in 2003, with long-term productivity increasing by up to 15 per cent in the sectors that experienced the largest tariff reductions. [60] While the decline in low-productivity jobs has reduced employment (up to 12 per cent of existing jobs), these job losses have lasted less than a decade; Overall, unemployment has declined in Canada since the legislation was passed. Trefler commented on the compromise, saying that the crucial trade policy issue was “how free trade can be implemented in an industrialized economy so that the long-term benefits and short-term adjustment costs borne by workers and others are recognized.” [61] In a 60-minute interview in September 2015, presidential candidate Donald Trump described NAFTA as “the worst trade deal ever approved in [the United States][121] and said that if elected, “he would either renegotiate or we would break it.” [122] [123] Juan Pablo Castaen [es], chairman of the trade group Consejo Coordinador Empresarial, expressed concern about the renegotiations and the desire to focus on the automotive industry. [124] A number of trade experts have stated that abandoning NAFTA would have a number of unintended consequences for the United States, including limited access to its key export markets, lower economic growth and higher prices for gasoline, cars, fruits and vegetables. [125] Members of Mexico`s private initiative have found that many laws need to be adapted by the United States to eliminate NAFTA.